Brett happens

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Posts Tagged ‘Amphorae

Two Galicians and an ugly duckling

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Ribeiro 2014, Coto de Gomariz ($26.95, 13075554)
A blend of Treixadura (70%), Albariño (10%), Godello (10%) and Loureiro (10%) from biodyanmically and organically (non-certified) farmed vines grown in granite, schist and clay on slopes and terraces near the village of Gomariz. The grapes are hand-picked, destemmed, crushed and lightly pressed. The juice is cold-settled and fermented in stainless steel tanks at low temperatures. Bottled from the tank on demand and always on a flower day. Vegan-compatible. Reducing sugar: 2.2 g/l. 13.5% ABV. Quebec agent: Vintrinsec.
Promising nose dominated by white grapefruit along with apple, pear, pineapple and background herbs and stone. Smooth and suave in the mouth. Quite dry. Brisk acidity lightens the somewhat viscous texture. Marked by sweet fruit upfront but minerals and dried fruit on the long finish. A sensation – faintly biting, like pepper can be (though the flavour isn’t at play) – that I suspect results from a combination of acid, mineral bitterness and maybe stealth tannins lingers after the fruit has disappeared, adding intrigue. (Buy again? Sure.)

coto-de-gomarizlagar-de-cerverala-del-vivo

Rias Baixas 2015, Lagar de Cervera ($27.40, 13159272)
100% Albariño from estate vineyards in O Rosla and Cambados. The manually harvested grapes were destemmed and macerated on the skins for 10 hours, followed by gentle pressing at 10C in an inert-gas atmosphere to prevent oxidation. After settling and racking, the must was fermented at 15C. One quarter of the wine underwent malolactic fermentation. Matured on its fine lees with occasional stirring. Saw only stainless steel until bottling. Reducing sugar: 2.8 g/l. 12.5% ABV. Quebec agent: Vinicolor.
Straightforward nose of grapefruit and quartz with faint white flower notes. In the mouth, the wine is middle-weighty, clean and as minerally as fruity. The smooth acidity barely ramps up the tension. A touch of bitterness on the fairly long finish adds welcome intrigue. Tasted twice – first at the store, then at the tasting – with consistent impressions, this well-made but somewhat listless wine was a disappointment, especially in view of the estate’s reputation and the glowing reviews the wine received in the media. Would likely show better alongside grilled fish. (Buy again? Meh.)

Bierzo 2013, La del Vivo, La Vizcaína, Raúl Pérez ($57.00, 12332045)
A relatively new project, La Vizcaína (“the Biscayan”) produces five wines – four reds and this white – using fruit from vineyards around cult winemaker Raúl Pérez’s hometown of Valtuille de Abajo. This is a blend of Doña Blanca (80%), Godello (10%) and Palomino (10%) from organically farmed vines, some planted as long ago as 1916. The manually harvested grapes are handled in two ways. Around 80% are pressed and racked into 500- and 700-litre French barrels for fermentation and maturation; they are left untouched for one year. The remainder are fermented on the skins in clay amphorae for one year, again untouched. The two parts are blended and the wine is bottled unfiltered and unfined. 13% ABV. Quebec agent: Vintrinsec.
The wine in our bottle was double-carafed about an hour before we tasted it. Gold bronze in the glass. Complex nose of straw, chalk, honey and a faintly acrid note that several tasters found off-putting, at least initially. Improved with time, developing scents of white spice, “sage,” “late corn field,” “yellow flowers” and “faint nuts.” A sip shows it to be rich, extracted, broad, just acidic enough, dry and not particularly fruity, and what fruit there is is candied. Wax, bitter, mineral and oxidative threads intertwine, most apparently on the long finish. Still, some tasters wanted nothing to do with it and “interesting” was about the best any of us could say. However, those of us who kept our glasses until the end of the tasting – four or five hours after the double-carafing – were amply rewarded, as the acridity had vanished and the wine had deepened, sweetened and become beautifully layered and coherent. Memorable. (Buy again? Yes.)

MWG February 17, 2017, tasting: flight 2 of 6

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Written by carswell

March 1, 2017 at 16:40

Amphora vs. cask (Bical round)

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Vinho Branco 2014, Post-Quercus, Filipa Pato ($22.09/500 ml, private import, 6 bottles/case)
100% Bical fom organically farmed vines; these may well be the same grapes as used to make the Nossa Calcáro described below, though I’ve not been able to confirm that. Fermented (with indigenous yeasts) and matured in buried terracotta amphorae. 11% ABV. Quebec agent: Importations du Moine.
Engaging nose of pear poached in réduit (boiled maple sap at the halfway point to becoming syrup) with notes of honey, orange peel and spice. In the mouth, the wine has a satiny texture, faint stone-fruit (white peach?) flavours, nose-echoing overtones along with some flint, and what one taster described as a “seawatery dryness.” Other tasters noted the relatively low acidity (“lacks spark,” “tastes flat”) and drew parallels with “dry cider.” While I can see their point, I found the wine oddly haunting and, convinced it’s intended more for the dining room than the tasting room, would love to try it alongside simply prepared white fish. (Buy again? Another bottle for sure.)

Bairrada 2014, Bical, Nossa Calcáro, Filipa Pato ($38.41, private import, 6 bottles/case)
100% Bical from organically farmed vines rooted in clay and limestone and averaging 25 years old. The vineyard in located in Óis do Bairro, a famous Bairrada wine village. Fermented with indigenous yeasts in 500-litre, temperature-controlled (sub 18°C) oak casks with stirring every month until the February following harvest. Bottled in May. 11.5% ABV. Quebec agent: Importations du Moine.
Bit funky/stinky, then gaining citrus aromas and turning brighter. A sip reveals a wine more conventional than the Post-Quercus: complex, dry and savoury, an elegant mouthful of white peach and hay heading to straw, grounded in flinty minerals, lifted by acidity and culminating in a long, bitter-edged, almond-toned finish. (Buy again? Yes, though not without wishing the price was closer to $30.)

MWG February 11th tasting: flight 2 of 6